Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

39242354_10217744951878170_2129033473518731264_n

How can it be the middle of August already?  Summer just started, and I haven’t gotten anything done!

Actually, that’s not entirely accurate.  The wagon is painted and back to towing duty for the Spartan trailer.  The ’34 roadster is getting there, I’ve solved the hot start flooding issue (fuel boiling in the carbs and flooding) with some Lexan carb base insulators I made.  The turn signal switch wore out in the ’61 T’bird column, I got a new one from Ecklers, but it came with a wire pulled out of the base, so another one is one the way.  I’m hand signaling for now.

35078161_10217230714222550_3402577210488389632_n

The pretty but never-cold-enough Frigidaire in the Spartan, above, was ash-canned in  favor of new apartment size fridge/freezer.  It’s 110 only, but I added an inverter so we can run it battery while traveling if we need to.  Actually, it stays cold all day with the door shut, so I may not need the battery backup.  The photo shows my last ditch effort to make it work by reducing the cabinet size.  That failed.  The gas absorption conversion we had done was an expensive and disappointing failure, but, live and learn.

The T’bird is all blocked out and waiting for the final coat of high-build and a guide coat, my goal is to have it in color by the time snow flies, so I guess it’s on schedule.  The Riv in the background is waiting, but I have all the interior, the engine is in, chassis done, it’s been designated a retirement project.  I did discover that long board sanding is a lot more difficult than it was when I was 35, so, the Riv now looks like a pretty challenging project.  It’ll keep me busy, anyway.

IMG_7190

I’ve had a moment of anxiety over a new health issue.  At my annual visit to my cardiologist, last week, an EKG revealed a new right bundle branch block.  In and of itself it doesn’t mean much, but in the context of my ascending aortic aneurysm, aortic valve, mild left ventricular hypertrophy and history of an MI, it’s concerning.  Had an echo yesterday, and await the findings.  My plan is to work until next December, when I’m 65, and retire at that time.  Let’s hope that plan works, as I have a lot of stuff to do.   As it’s asymptomatic, I’m hoping that it doesn’t indicate any new, serious issue.

We’re getting ready for this weekends “Relix Riot” at the Gilmore Museum.  This is our favorite, and now only, summer car show, hosted by our pals in the Relix club from Grand Rapids.  After that, camping at the Yankee Springs State Park, a 2 week Michigan vacation and then the Fall TCT rally, and summer’s officially over.   It goes fast, but I’m trying to beat the the clock!

 

 

I went to a local muffler shop the other day and got two 10′ sticks of 2″ exhaust tubing, and had them bend a 90 degree in one end of each.  I also bought two steel pack “resonators”, some chrome exhaust tips, and handful of clamps and hangers.

I hung the tubing temporarily under the car after welding the header flanges on, and fired it up.  It was evident that mufflers were going to be redundant, so, the car now has straight pipes.  I like the way it cackles under throttle, it’s pretty mellow going down the road, and, best of all, I did it myself.  I did put a little “bow” in the pipes by putting a 2×4 between the pipes and the frame in the center, and jacking the back up until the pipes hit the gas tank.

Now, on to the top.

…or so says Neil Young.  Kim has been asking me to fix the (tiny) rust blisters on the ’51 Pontiac wagons fenders for a couple seasons, since she got a Celebrity Choice pick at Autorama in Detroit with it last month, I figured I’d better get it done.

Of course, it was way worse than it looked at the surface.  Here’s how I fixed it:

img_4077img_4063-1
So, I made some new fender skirts while I was at it…

img_4261img_4257
And the doors were rusty too…


Now it’s ready for primer and paint.

Seriously?  It’s April 4!  This is not roadster weather!  28685851_10216425438251154_8388987590613026421_nActually, I don’t mind, because I’m not finished up yet anyway.  We have driven the car a couple of times, it has 20 miles on the odometer, enough to find a couple of little bugs that I’ve taken care of (the shifter selector shaft seal, and a radiator hose that wasn’t quite tight enough, which I fixed, but now the gas gauge isn’t working), and I still need to get the canvas on the top made and get it licensed, but, there’s light at the end of the tunnel.

28576339_10216407729968458_5737247408847131065_n

I had “Fly’n Brian” painted on the tail pan at “Motorama” at Cobo Hall, in a tribute to the cars original name, “Flying Flathead”,  where we debut the car. I’m very happy with that, although the casual observer won’t know the story.  I also got the set of steel ’49 Chevy wheels blasted and painted,  ad the wide whites (seen in the first photo) mounted, and I have to say I like that look.  It actually drives pretty well with the bias ply tires too, so, I think we’ll like it both ways.  The little 283 boils the skinny bias plus all the way through second, which it won’t do with the big, sticky radials.  Fun.

28468709_10216332675932154_3946276551140649998_n

We drove it to the Gilmore Car Museum before Cobo on a sunny March day, and I’ve driven my grandson Milo around the yard a few times.  He approves, and we’re looking forward to a summer of fun with this little roadster.

It’s gonna be a blast!

29694459_10211149046498424_3459442564557407764_n

img_4186.jpg

29789912_10216663014670416_7929033990538135304_n

wiring

Posted: January 11, 2018 in Uncategorized

Found this blog by a young couple in Florida restoring their Spartan Manor. Great job guys!

mind your manor

This is the area where the credit goes to my brilliant spouse. He studied various wiring diagrams and researched everything we’d need to turn our aluminum box into a functioning home away from home. He was able to teach himself how to wire the entire camper and then actually wire the entire camper in a little over a week.

The first thing we did was sit down and draw a diagram of the camper and talk through where we wanted switches, what kinds of lights we wanted (dimmers or normal, pendant or recessed, etc.) and then made a shopping list. The recessed lights were the first thing we decided we wanted in each room. The difficulty though was that the ceiling space in the camper is very limited compared to what you’d have in a home. So we knew we would need something low profile that didn’t require a bulky…

View original post 652 more words

BRRRRRRR….

Posted: January 5, 2018 in Hot Rod, Uncategorized
Tags: , , ,

26219386_10215859408700769_1158416836004389838_n

It’s a relatively balmy 8.5 degrees F here today, which may seem cold to my warm weather friends, but if we keep in mind thats 3 X as warm as it was last night when I came in from the shop, it seems better.  The shop air temp warmed up pretty quickly to 50 degrees, but the floor, the tools, equipment and 4 cars remained a chilly 20 something, which made working not very pleasant, although it was acceptable with a sweatshirt and insulated boots.

Anyway, I got the headlights DONE!  I’m happy, and slightly impressed, with the job I did on the wiring harness.  Everything worked first time, the lights are very bright, the turn signals work (amazing), and I really like the amber glow of the park lights and turn signals.

26219377_10215859408380761_667256176436553198_n

The headlights are ’36 Chevy commercial housings, I added a base for Halogen bulbs, and a socket for 1157 park/turn bulbs.  The silvering on the reflectors polished up beautifully with a bit of Wrights Silver Cream, and the hole I initially drilled in the bottom of the left light was easily fixed with a stip of Gorilla tape to the rear, and a small circle of HVAC aluminum tape on the sticky side of the Gorilla tape in the hole.  Invisible behind the lens.  Which very proudly proclaims “Chevrolet” at the top, and “Tilt-Ray” on the bottom.

Just a little hint as to what lurks under the hood.

23244159_10215357173105193_2556155068452531867_n

Forgive the dust on the car, look past the clutter, do what I do and just let this soak in.  It’s been a little over a year with this ’34, it’s gone from a pile of mis-matched reproduction and ancient, cast off parts to a roller, that’s wiring and upholstery away from being a car.  It looks exactly as I imagined when I started, which sort of amazes me every time I look at it.

And I go out to the garage and just look at it a LOT.

IMG_8885

I won’t re-hash the build step by step, that’s already done here.  Suffice to say that I’ve learned a lot, gotten frustrated, done a lot of steps over, and put a lot of other stuff on the back burner to get this car to this point.  It’s a 40 year long fantasy fulfilled, that of having a ’34 Roadster.

I must say, I’m rather proud of myself.

I’m at the point now where I can imagine Kim and taking an evening cruise in the summer,  color touring on a crisp autumn afternoon, and a cross country trip with the rumble seat loaded with luggage.  Vague fantasy just a couple years ago, now just a few months of tinkering away.  Not that we couldn’t do all these things with the ’48 Pontiac convertible we’d had for 40 years that got sold to finance this, we did, and could have kept on doing those things with that car, but fate intervened and the “next project” beckoned.

imageOur friends Brandon and Liz from the vintage trailer group we belong to had tried (rather relentlessly) to convince us to part with the ’51 Pontiac wagon, but we weren’t ready to let it go.  They even came over to the house to try to convince us to sell it to them, but seeing the convertible in the garage, unused for three years, asked if we’d part with it.  We hadn’t considered selling it, and when we considered the pros and cons of keeping it, and doing the things I thought it would take to make me happy with the car, versus parting with it, having some extra garage space, and the chance to move on, it seemed like the right thing to do.

Brandon has done all things that I wanted to do to the car, it’s rewarding to see it used and enjoyed, as opposed to it gathering dust under a car cover.  I had “built” the car several times, there had been 4 different engines under the hood, several paint jobs, 3 interiors, and I wasn’t enthused about starting over with it again.

Sort of a “been there, done that” kind of thing.

IMG_7188.JPGSo, we’ve moved on.  I’m still using the T’bird as a work bench, storage shelf, and coffee table, and the Riviera hasn’t been touched for almost 2 years.  That’s OK.  Retirement is just around the corner4, and I’ll need some things to do.  The “heavy lifting” and big expenses are all done on both of them, it’s down to body work, paint and interior for both, the things I really like to do, so I think I’m set for activities to keep me busy, and have a pretty interesting collection of cars. when they’re completed.

23319154_10215357171825161_780568844160299034_n

So, this is where I am.  I’ve been invited to show the roadster at the Detroit “Auto-Rama” at Cobo hall in February, I should be able to get the interior and have the car wired for that.  It’s flattering to be asked, and would make a good debut, so that is a reasonable and realistic goal.

Now, I just have to stop going out to the shop, sitting in a lawn chair by the T’bird and staring at ’34.  Time’s a wasting!